Glaze colors

 
New glaze colors coming this fall!

We love to double-dip!

 

Can't decide between two colors? We can often use both of them in the same piece.

 

Check out our gallery for ideas of colors that play well together!

Learn about our glazes here!

On Brown Speck clay

Eggnog

It's true.
 
You really haven't lived until you've sipped some homemade eggnog, sprinkled with freshly grated nutmeg, seated next to a blazing fire on a cold Christmas Eve.
 
That's just how it's done in the mountains.

Eggnog glaze is a creamy tan color with specks of rust: cozy, warm, inviting. Eggnog looks beautiful with our Tin Roof glaze.
 
 Blazing fire not included. 

Tin Roof

The Hilton is Calling.
 
Over on the Tennessee side of the Smoky Mountains, the old-timers used to camp in a shack in the woods. They called it "The Hilton."
 
Well, The Hilton got torn down some twenty years ago, but Tin Roof is as close as we can get to having our own little campsite; rustic, well-loved, and homey.  
 
This gorgeous rust-colored glaze looks great in combination with Eggnog, or with a Wood Ash edging.
Greenville (with Rutile border)
Which Greenville did we name this glaze after? Take your pick! Chances are, if you visit any Green(e)ville in the mountains of the Southeastern US, you'll find clear blue skies and verdant forests. That's what we had in mind when we picked this glaze name.

The edging we love to use, Rutile, is made from the mineral of the same name, though we think it'd also be a great name for a bluegrass band!

This glaze looks beautiful on both our Brown Speck and our White clays; on Brown Speck clay, it looks relaxed, contemporary, and soothing.
 

Mint Jelly (with Lacey Cookie border)

Leave the juleps to those fair-weather horse-race folk.


Mountain people know how to preserve mint to enjoy year-round. We absolutely love the "jelly" finish of this glaze; not too opaque, not too transparent.

We make it even better by adding a border of bronze that we call Lacey Cookie because it looks like one of Pop-pop Farley's favorite desserts (he passed away at 94 and always loved Jamie's cookies the best).

 

This glaze combo looks equally well on our White clay, but on Brown Speck clay it's soothing, cozy, and chic.

 

Wood Ash

Beauty from the Ashes.

 

Back in the day, North Carolina potters used to use the old ash from their wood-burning stoves to make this glaze color.

 

We have a little more sophisticated method at Farley Pottery, but we love the way this glaze drips in beautiful patterns on the vessels! Wood Ash comes in a mossy green (above) and a deep turquoise (below).

 

We'd describe this glaze as natural, artistic, and elegant. Green Wood Ash looks great as a contrasting edging to our Tin Roof glaze.

On White clay

Blue Ridge Blue
Scientists say that the trees' releasing isoprene into the surrounding atmosphere is what makes the Blue Ridge Mountains have their distinctive navy blue color when viewed from a distance.

We say, who cares what the scientists say? Just enjoy the view!
 
Blue Ridge Blue is a lovely medium-dark blue that mixes and matches very nicely with our signature red, Smoky Mountain Sunset, for a Fiestaware look.

We think this glaze will add a fashionable, clean, and unpretentious look to your home.


Smoky Mountain Sunset

Welcome to The Golden Hour.

 

We don't mean to brag (okay, maybe we do), but our sunrises and sunsets in North Carolina are pretty spectacular, and occasionally we'll get one of those sunsets that look like the mountains are on fire.

So, when we saw this bright, blood-red glaze, we had to call it Smoky Mountain Sunset (even though the name is longish, and perhaps more than a little cliche).


This glaze color is for hosts who don't mind having their dishes noticed; bold, cheerful, and simple.

Greenville (with Rutile border)
Which Greenville did we name this glaze after? Take your pick! Chances are, if you visit any Green(e)ville in the mountains of the Southeastern US, you'll find clear blue skies and verdant forests. That's what we had in mind when we picked this glaze name.
 
The edging we love to use, Rutile, is made from the mineral of the same name, though we think it'd also be a great name for a bluegrass band!
 
This glaze looks beautiful on both our Brown Speck and our White clays; on White clay, we often get a lovely rainbow effect. This particular combination is Cindy's favorite; it looks happy, unpretentious, and a little bohemian.

Mint Jelly (with Lacey Cookie border)

Leave the juleps to those fair-weather horse-race folk.

 

Mountain people know how to preserve mint to enjoy year-round. We absolutely love the "jelly" finish of this glaze; not too opaque, not too transparent.

We make it even better by adding a border of bronze that we call Lacey Cookie because it looks like one of Pop-pop Farley's favorite desserts (he passed away at 94 and always loved Jamie's cookies the best).


These glaze colors also look great on Brown Speck clay, but it is Jamie's all-time favorite on our White clay: unique, elegant, and modern.